DIR IT Leadership Technology Driven Value 

Glossary 

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The Framework uses the following terms:

agency: as defined in Texas Government Code, Chapter 2054, a department, commission, board, office, council, authority, or other agency in the executive or judicial branch of state government that is created by the constitution or a statute of this state, including a university system or institution of higher education

agency head: top-most senior manager with operational accountability for an agency, such as an executive director, commissioner, university president, university chancellor, comptroller, or board president

artifact: any item created during project delivery such as meeting minutes, contract, Project Plan, and deliverables

baseline: a group of products and/or deliverables that have been formally accepted at a specific point within the project; serves as a basis for further work and can be changed only through formal change control processes

business: activities that achieve the core mission(s) of the organization. The activities include providing direct services to constituents, and indirect support such as accounting and information resources management

business outcomes: results of the project that improve the ability of the organization to achieve its mission. Outcomes may include things such as fulfilling broad organization goals, attaining specific operational objectives, and providing specific, measurable operational improvements.

CAT: Contract Advisory Team

CATRAD: CPA’s Contract Advisory Team Review and Delegation Application used to submit solicitation information

Change Control Board (CCB): group of stakeholders responsible for evaluating and approving proposed changes to project baselines such as project scope and budget

change management: process and procedures to identify, propose, document, review, evaluate, authorize, and track any changes to project baselines such as project scope and budget changes

communication management: subset of project management that includes the processes for formal management of project communication among stakeholders

configuration control: an element of configuration management that consists of the evaluation, coordination, approval, and implementation of changes to configuration items

Configuration Control Board (CCB): group of stakeholders responsible for evaluating and approving proposed changes to configuration items, and for ensuring implementation of approved changes

configuration identification: element of configuration management that consists of selecting the configuration items to place under configuration management

configuration item: work product that is placed under configuration management and treated as a single entity

configuration management: subset of project management that includes the processes for formally identifying and controlling project configuration items

configuration status accounting: element of configuration management that consists of recording and reporting information needed to manage a configuration effectively

CPA: Comptroller of Public Accounts

Executive Sponsor: a non-IT senior-level manager who oversees development of specific Framework deliverables from a business perspective and who certifies the accuracy, viability, and defensibility of the business-related content of those deliverables

Framework Extensions: guidance and tools for various types of technology projects and project delivery environments that interpret and extend the base set of practices already found in the Framework

functional configuration audit: audit conducted to verify that the development of a configuration item was completed satisfactorily, that the item achieved the performance and functional characteristics specified in the requirements, and that its operational and support documents are complete and satisfactory

LBB: Legislative Budget Board

major contract: contract that has a value of at least $1 million during the original term of the contract, not including any renewal periods

major information resources project: as defined in Texas Government Code, Chapter 2054, any information resources technology project identified in a state agency's biennial operating plan whose development costs exceed $1 million and that:

  • requires one year or longer to reach operations status;
  • involves more than one state agency; or
  • substantially alters work methods of state agency personnel or the delivery of services to clients;

and any information resources technology project designated by the legislature in the General Appropriations Act as a major information resources project

PDF: Portable Document Format; a standard for representing electronic documents, allowing them to be transmitted and reproduced accurately

performance management: subset of project management that includes the processes for measuring the performance of the product and/or service delivered by the project

physical configuration audit: audit conducted to verify that a configuration item, as built, conforms to the technical documentation that defines it

project: as defined in  Texas Government Code, Chapter 2054, a project means an initiative that provides information resources technologies and creates products, services, or results within or among elements of a state agency; and characterized by well-defined parameters, specific objectives, common benefits, planned activities, a scheduled completion date, and an established budget with a specified source of funding

project costs: as defined in the Information Technology Detail (ITD) instructions, a total of all costs that are associated with a project, including all Information Resources (IR) internal staff costs and all IR procurements, whether purchased, rented, leased, leased for purchase, or licensed, for all hardware, software, and services, regardless of source of funding or method of procurement. The project life-cycle costs include all development costs until a project is placed in production. End-user staff members advising the project team on user requirements are not included in the project cost unless more than half of their time is devoted to the project.

project management practices: as defined in Texas Government Code, Chapter 2054 and Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 216; documented and repeatable activities through which a state agency applies knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to satisfy project activity requirements

QAT: Quality Assurance Team

quality management: within the context of a project, a subset of project management that includes the processes required to help ensure the project will satisfy the business goals and objectives; it consists of quality planning, quality assurance, and quality control

required tool: a tool included or referenced within the base Framework that must be used/completed for major information resources projects and certain major contracts 

review gate: a distinct division of project effort for a specified purpose that involves successful completion of specific deliverables in order to obtain agency head approval before proceeding with the remaining project activities. Each review gate is intended to synchronize the state’s investment in a project based on approval of business outcomes at a specific point during project delivery.

risk management: subset of project management that includes the processes for identification, analysis, and responses to project risks

SAO: State Auditor’s Office

scope: within the context of a project, the sum of the products and services to be provided by the project

SDLC: System Development Life Cycle

searchable PDF: a file format that is an image of the original document with a hidden, searchable text layer. Unlike a normal PDF file where the file can be edited in Acrobat, a searchable PDF file can only have the text searched from within Acrobat or other searching software.

stakeholder: a group or individual who can affect or who is affected by the success of a project

supplemental tool: a tool that agencies must use or replace with an equivalent tool that serves the same purpose and intent. When an equivalent tool is used, it must include, at a minimum, the information identified in the Framework supplemental tool it is replacing. Regardless of whether a Framework supplemental or agency-equivalent tool is used, certain project deliverables must be submitted.

Technology Sponsor: an information technology senior-level manager who oversees development of specific Framework deliverables from a technology perspective, who certifies the accuracy, viability, and defensibility of the technology-related content of those deliverables, and who functions as the IRM or a person designated by the IRM. 


For more information about the Texas Project Delivery Framework, contact projectdelivery@dir.texas.gov.